Secondary schools -subjectively ?

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Louise
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Re: Secondary schools -subjectively ?

Postby Louise » Thu Feb 27, 2014 2:26 pm

If you have girls and they respond well to pressure you should have a look at Withington. Their facilities knock most of the other schools into a cocked hat and their academic results are very good indeed.

There is also Manchester High School for Girls. It felt very old fashioned to me. They had a room full of sewing machines which was enough to put me right off. It was before sewing got fashionable again.

I really liked St. Bedes, it seemed very holistic. Ultimately we chose WRHS. There seemed to be a great atmosphere and it was the nearest to us. I think single sex schools for girls is great. I would never send a boy to a single sex school though, think "Lord of the Flies"

We also looked at Trinity. It's a decent school.

I don't know if it's the same drill now but if you wanted a school which wasn't the obvious choice it helped to make a decision by year 5 and to write a letter to the school you have chosen, as they have waiting lists and you need to get near the front of the queue.

I have just noticed this is my 3333d post. I never thought I would live this long. Yay!

alr1970
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Re: Secondary schools -subjectively ?

Postby alr1970 » Thu Feb 27, 2014 6:11 pm

Someone once said to me that CHS is a school where you'll meet someone who will go to Oxford or Cambridge, and someone who will end up in prison. It's very diverse. It is also immensely better than 10 years ago, when it was a hole.

One thing it suffers from is a gender imbalance caused by WR Girls' High up the road sucking up a big chunk of the girls, and there's no corresponding boys' school to balance it out.

We were happy enough with it when we visited, the head gives a good talk, he's very businesslike and I can see that his manner must inspire a lot of the pupils. I understand that they do act on bullying etc., which is essential because there are a lot of rough kids there, but you have to be proactive as a parent to get anything done. There are 1500 pupils there, it's huge, so expecting them to spot trouble is expecting too much.

If you want your child to get a proper comprehensive education, mixing with all sorts and learning to stand up for themself, it's as good a school as any in my opinion.

We looked at William Hulme, and it is as close to a Hogwarts experience at you'll get round here. Big grand old buildings, lots of wood and history. And an army cadet force, if you like that sort of thing. It really is holding on to the old independent ethos, building pillars of the community. Entrance is mostly based on distance from the school, but they do an odd streaming test to get an even spread of abilities. They also select something like 10 kids who do well on a language aptitude test, regardless of distance. And if you're in the junior school you get in automatically.

My eldest will be starting at Stretford Grammar next year. She liked it best of all the schools we visited, it had a very calm feel to it (we visited during school hours) and it is a more modest size than CHS - 120 per year. She didn't have a tutor for the test, we just got her to practice the sample papers to get to grips with the skills needed. We were wary of tutoring, as we've heard that some kids who get heavily tutored then struggle in selective schools. (It did help SGS that it was most like the school I went to in scale, and also has a similar shabby but cared-for feel to most of the buildings).

Politically, I would argue against selective schooling, but I won't let that affect my choices when it comes to the crunch when choosing for my children. The whole system in this area is terribly unbalanced, the geography doesn't help (the Mersey and M60 are a massive barrier), the fact that we're right on the Manchester /Trafford border (it runs past Stretford's boundary), and the presence of a single-sex state school all distort the choices available to us. My advice would be to visit all the possibilites and make your own mind up. You know your children best, after all, so you are the best person to decide.

Andrew

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annie
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Re: Secondary schools -subjectively ?

Postby annie » Fri Feb 28, 2014 8:46 am

Louise wrote: I think single sex schools for girls is great. I would never send a boy to a single sex school though, think "Lord of the Flies"


It is my earnest belief that no matter how much a girls' only school might encourage girls to excel, the sheer social imbalance, at a time in their lives when social interaction is key, is fundamentally unfair and wrong. Some cultures welcome this kind of backward segregation, unfortunately, but if I had a daughter, I would avoid an artless, "enterprise-based" single-sex establishment like WRHSFG.
One must always be wary of the march of the right-wing. I advocate public flogging/confiscation of assets/rehoming of their young

Kristen
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Re: Secondary schools -subjectively ?

Postby Kristen » Fri Feb 28, 2014 2:09 pm

annie wrote:
Louise wrote: I think single sex schools for girls is great.......


It is my earnest belief that no matter how much a girls' only school might encourage girls to excel, the sheer social imbalance, at a time in their lives when social interaction is key, is fundamentally unfair and wrong. Some cultures welcome this kind of backward segregation, unfortunately, but if I had a daughter, I would avoid an artless, "enterprise-based" single-sex establishment like WRHSFG.


If I had a daughter then in an ideal world I would send my daughter to a mixed sex school that achieved good results. However, if I knew there was a girls' only school that achieved better results then I would send my daughter there.

I think youth (16-24 years) unemployment is currently c.19.5% and in this very competitive employment market then you wish the best for your child (in terms of both career and being able to mix comfortably with the opposite sex) however I think mixing with the opposite sex is something that can be caught up on later on (saying that I'm sure boys and girls mix outside of school) but your education is something you have got to make the most of at each stage; good school, good exam results, straight into a good job or onto a reputable degree or vocational course.

Good jobs are difficult to come by for young people today and I think if this means sending your daughter to a girls' only school whilst not ideal it is the better option.

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annie
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Re: Secondary schools -subjectively ?

Postby annie » Fri Feb 28, 2014 7:16 pm

Kristen wrote:Good jobs are difficult to come by for young people today and I think if this means sending your daughter to a girls' only school whilst not ideal it is the better option.


Depends on your view of life. For me, a school has to educate a child and inspire them. For others it's about "results" and "league tables"... which, to me, isn't the priority.

Your mileage may vary.
One must always be wary of the march of the right-wing. I advocate public flogging/confiscation of assets/rehoming of their young

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Louise
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Re: Secondary schools -subjectively ?

Postby Louise » Fri Feb 28, 2014 7:44 pm

I think there was a certain degree of inspiration for the girls which may have been lacking in a mixed school. Representatives of male dominated professions could concentrate their attention on the girls rather than having any discussion dominated by the boys.


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