Working from home

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t0ria
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Location: Chorlton

Working from home

Postby t0ria » Mon Jan 27, 2014 1:52 pm

In a few weeks I will stop living the dream as a middle manager in the civil service and will start a new job working from home.

I'm really excited about it (especially as it means I can spend more time on my campervan hire business) but am a bit worried about the isolation of home working. I know I'm going to have to be very disciplined and make sure I get out of bed and don't spend the whole day in my pyjamas, but also I would like to see people occasionally.

I think I'm going to get in touch with Chorlton Good Neighbours and volunteer to walk dogs or something to get me out of the house and do some exercise, but does anyone know of any local home workers groups or clubs that might have get togethers?

ElevenEleven

Re: Working from home

Postby ElevenEleven » Mon Jan 27, 2014 4:38 pm

Hi Toria,

I work from home most of the time, and have done on and off for the past few years. When I started I read a tip that said you should get up each morning and get showered and changed just as if you were going to an office. This helps get you into mindset of 'going to work' and gets you in to a routine, even if it is only across the landing :)

It can be a bit 'cabin feverish' sometimes. When I feel like this I go and work for a hour or so in a local cafe that has wifi, and of course buy maybe something to eat and drink. This helps me have a change of scenery and re-focus my train of thought, particularly if I am working on something that I need a flash of inspiration for.

As far as groups are concerned, I'm sorry I don't know of any in and around Chorlton but there is a networking group in town called 'The Talk of Manchester': http://www.thetalkofmanchester.co.uk/.

Hope some of this helps.

ash pole
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Re: Working from home

Postby ash pole » Mon Jan 27, 2014 8:20 pm

I've always wondered what sort of work people who work from home actually do, if you don't mind me asking... I'd like to try it. I think.

Kristen
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Re: Working from home

Postby Kristen » Mon Jan 27, 2014 8:29 pm

t0ria wrote:
I'm really excited about it (especially as it means I can spend more time on my campervan hire business




Am I correct in thinking this is hiring out two campervans? Will that really take up 35 hours a week?

Were you not tempted to stay in your current job for a while longer? I mean you could reply to enquiries in the evenings. It just seems like you are putting a lot of time aside for something that won't take up much time.

Good luck to you but I can't help but feel you will bored .... you will have a few e-mails to reply to if people enquire and a phone to answer but couldn't you just have a mobile number they could get you on?

Kristen
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Re: Working from home

Postby Kristen » Mon Jan 27, 2014 9:14 pm

ash pole wrote:I've always wondered what sort of work people who work from home actually do ....


They like to drink a lot so are never worried the next day of appearing hungover in work and when they ever make it into the office they arrive at 11am and leave before 3pm and think this is acceptable.

They seem to forget that their colleagues can all make it into the office before 9am and leave after 5pm but because they work from home they seem to think they can come and go as they please.

When they are in the office they will spend at least half their time moaning about something, the journey into the office, the cost of heating their home (well think how much you are saving on the daily commute), how they feel isolated and left out from what's going on in the office. Well go into the office more and when you do try staying in the office for 7 hours like all your colleagues do!!!

Don't even get me started on people that work from home and 'manage' staff. I put manage in quotes as the level of support from managers who work from home is truly shocking.

In my opinion, if you want to get ahead at work you cannot work full time at home.

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t0ria
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Re: Working from home

Postby t0ria » Mon Jan 27, 2014 9:34 pm

Kristen wrote:Were you not tempted to stay in your current job for a while longer? I mean you could reply to enquiries in the evenings. It just seems like you are putting a lot of time aside for something that won't take up much time.

Good luck to you but I can't help but feel you will bored .... you will have a few e-mails to reply to if people enquire and a phone to answer but couldn't you just have a mobile number they could get you on?


I've got a job working 25 hours a week from home for a London based company who organise pub quizzes and corporate events. I will be working remotely and setting up the Manchester arm (by myself). Because of this I will have time to do the campervan business as well. I can't run it working full time, I need to be available for handovers, to do maintenance, and to keep up to date with bookkeeping and marketing. I'm struggling to even find time to get advertising arranged at the moment. My current job is in court so I am not able to answer the phone.


Kristen wrote:
ash pole wrote:I've always wondered what sort of work people who work from home actually do ....



In my opinion, if you want to get ahead at work you cannot work full time at home.

Having spent the last 16 years in the civil service I can honestly say I no longer care less about getting ahead. I want a nice life with enough money to pay the bills and plenty of time off. I'm not bothered about making a million pounds and slogging my guts out for 60 hours a week.

But thanks for your concern.......

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Phila
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Re: Working from home

Postby Phila » Tue Jan 28, 2014 12:25 am

Hi t0ria, (did I spell it correctly?)
I too have recently started WFH. I think it quite brave of you to ask these questions. I am trying to adapt to the difference in lifestyle, and the encouraging words and suggestions by 11-11(excuse the shortcut) are much appreciated. However, someone else on this thread sounds a little bitter, and I wonder why?
Previously, I didn't have to pay for the commute (Lucky Me), but I do have to work away for long stints so there is a kind of offset there, I feel.
Not all of our lives are or should be based around the 9-5 mentality, which I think you have shown in more ways than 6.
Again, good luck with the campers!

ElevenEleven

Re: Working from home

Postby ElevenEleven » Tue Jan 28, 2014 8:56 am

Kristen wrote:
ash pole wrote:I've always wondered what sort of work people who work from home actually do ....


They like to drink a lot so are never worried the next day of appearing hungover in work and when they ever make it into the office they arrive at 11am and leave before 3pm and think this is acceptable.

They seem to forget that their colleagues can all make it into the office before 9am and leave after 5pm but because they work from home they seem to think they can come and go as they please.

When they are in the office they will spend at least half their time moaning about something, the journey into the office, the cost of heating their home (well think how much you are saving on the daily commute), how they feel isolated and left out from what's going on in the office. Well go into the office more and when you do try staying in the office for 7 hours like all your colleagues do!!!

Don't even get me started on people that work from home and 'manage' staff. I put manage in quotes as the level of support from managers who work from home is truly shocking.

In my opinion, if you want to get ahead at work you cannot work full time at home.


What a load of bitter b**locks! I work for myself actually, contracting as a software developer working for clients all around the world. Yes I can come and go as I please as I am my own boss, but this is of my own making and determination to get to this point in life. I don't feel isolated being out of an office at all, in fact I actually like being out of an office environment on a permanent basis where a lot of people form cliques, bitch about each other all day and get involved with utterly trivial office politics. I've been there, done that.

More and more companies are encouraging employees to work from home as it also helps cut down on the daily commute and therefore helps reduce their carbon footprint. It also reduces overheads for companies as they don't have to provide desk space so it's a win-win all round. I choose to take contracts that mean I can work from home so I can achieve the work life balance I want, therefore being happier overall. Why should I sit in traffic for a hour in the morning if I don't have to, or spoon some sweaty 6 and 1/2 foot man on the tram because it's already rammed by the time it gets to Chorlton!? I used to work permanently for IBM who predict that a lot of people will be working in virtual offices in 30 years time. I know this is a long way off but this technology is currently in the R&D phase and WILL be happening.

It really does wind me up when people think that homeworkers just sit around in their pants all day watching television. It couldn't be further from the truth as I have deadlines to meet and milestones to deliver. If they are not met then I'm not paid. Simple isn't it?

This forum sometimes is used just so people can vent their anger, well Toria asked a question that required an informative answer. She didn't ask for your bitter opinion.

Thank you.
Last edited by ElevenEleven on Tue Jan 28, 2014 9:46 pm, edited 2 times in total.

disappointedofm21
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Re: Working from home

Postby disappointedofm21 » Tue Jan 28, 2014 10:21 am

I too work from home - have done for years. But the truth is it's not for everyone. Certain people - such as the somewhat embittered earlier poster - are just not cut out for it. They prefer the routine of the shared workplace : the constant rounds of making tea for half the office, the five minute chats about last nights tv that turn into half an hour, the gossiping about anyone in the place who isn't part of the in-crowd, etc...

Essentially, if you work from home (particularly if you are self-employed) you spend your time working. Half the folk in the office spend a good part of the day procrastinating. Without the distractions I can achieve far more in a 7 hour day than I ever did in 10 hours in the office.

Good luck with it t0ria - you sound like the kind of self-motivated person who will thrive in your new circumstances

munchkin
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Location: Chorlton

Re: Working from home

Postby munchkin » Tue Jan 28, 2014 10:45 am

hi toria
I used to work from home running my own business too . I did miss the social aspect of working with other people and understand why you would want to replace that with something. For my own part I got so busy that I didn't really have time for the other things and to agree with others I got far more done working from home than I ever would do in an office.

It really just depends on your attitude, someone who is a slacker at work will probably be one at home too but running your own business does tend to concentrate your mind rather and it sounds like you have the enthusiasm to do that.

I suggest you try to designate an 'office' space which doesn't have too many distractions and try to stick to a routine: getting up, starting work promptly, lunchtimes, breaktimes, etc.

If you do have any free time perhaps you should set up a Chorlton homeworkers group. I bet there are thousands of people doing it round here!

Good luck !!

lister
Posts: 154
Joined: Sat Jan 05, 2013 5:56 pm

Re: Working from home

Postby lister » Tue Jan 28, 2014 11:32 am

I disagree that most people would be working remotely, but then I'm sure IBM et al know a lot more about it than I do.

I for one would be unsuited to home working - I don't like mixing home/work and wouldn't have the discipline to seperate them fully.

Have you looked into hot desking? Renting a desk in an office with other people, an internet connection and a desk?

ElevenEleven

Re: Working from home

Postby ElevenEleven » Tue Jan 28, 2014 11:45 am

lister wrote:Have you looked into hot desking? Renting a desk in an office with other people, an internet connection and a desk?


Hi Lister, good call; there are some cheap hot desking options in the town centre where you can rent a desk for just a day if you want to

Sarah_B
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Location: Chorlton

Re: Working from home

Postby Sarah_B » Tue Jan 28, 2014 1:44 pm

One of my friends works in an office but her boss works at home all the time. She tells me she gets no support off him and he is difficult to contact at home. She has raised this in appraisals but has said it doesn't get her anywhere.

I think working from home can work well but the whole organisation has to see this as a good way of working and adapt accordingly.

I think if you are self-employed it can work very well and if you are employed too but if your targets are very much just focused on yourself.

However, if you work as part of a team and colleagues rely on you then there needs to be a little more thought otherwise it does not always work well as I can speak personally from what I have seen as people that work from home are sometimes viewed as just concentrating on their own core targets and not those of the wider team.

tOria I think you have nothing to worry about. 25 hours employment a week and your campervan hire business and enough local groups for you to get involved with too.

ladyheather
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Re: Working from home

Postby ladyheather » Tue Jan 28, 2014 1:58 pm

Hi Toria, I work from home and whilst it can be a bit isolating, I have found I schedule certain 'distractions' eg I listen to Women's Hour from 10-11am whilst I work, there's a Twitter homeworkers discussion daily using #watercoolermoment which you can just join in to chat or seek advice, and so on. Being busy with work certainly helps the time pass. My sense of isolation comes more from having to always make my own decisions, which can be wearisome.

Kristen
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Joined: Mon Oct 28, 2013 1:18 pm

Re: Working from home

Postby Kristen » Tue Jan 28, 2014 5:49 pm

ElevenEleven wrote:
She didn't ask for your bitter opinion.



I was answering ash pole's question not tOria's :roll:

When people work from home this can have repercussions for other staff, especially staff that work in teams and I am simply highlighting the other side that for staff who work in the office they sometimes do 'carry' staff that work from home.

This obviously does not apply to tOria and I wish her all the very best. I was thinking she would have been spending all her time on the campervan hire business and my comments were of genuine concern. Not always wise to put all your eggs in one basket but I can now tOria also has another job too.

Most people that have replied on this thread are either self employed or have clearly defined individual targets and in those instances I think if you work from home it can work very well.


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