Working from home

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still_ill
Posts: 214
Joined: Sun Jan 01, 2012 10:01 am

Re: Working from home

Postby still_ill » Tue Jan 28, 2014 6:44 pm

Not sure i could discipline myself to work from home. I know for a fact i'd snooze in until around lunchtime, probably wouldn't get showered or dressed, would end up working in my laptop whilst watching TV, and would find it very hard to not go for a liquid lunch each day.

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annie
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Joined: Thu Apr 08, 2004 2:08 am
Location: Chorlton

Re: Working from home

Postby annie » Tue Jan 28, 2014 7:02 pm

Working from home is brilliant. So long as you complete your tasks for the day, there's no artificial structure to bog you down. There's no boss to glare at you for "not looking busy", and no distractions from deadbeat colleagues.

If you're really tired because you've been staring at spreadsheets all morning, you can lie down and take a power nap before coming back to them, refreshed.

Some people work better in a non-conventional environment. Kristen is talking bollox.
One must always be wary of the march of the right-wing. I advocate public flogging/confiscation of assets/rehoming of their young

Kristen
Posts: 17
Joined: Mon Oct 28, 2013 1:18 pm

Re: Working from home

Postby Kristen » Tue Jan 28, 2014 10:31 pm

I agree with what you are saying annie but only if you don't work in a team environment and you have your own clearly defined goals.

If you work from home you avoid distractions, I agree and can then concentrate on your own clearly defined goals.

However, imagine if you worked in a team of five people and you had a new member of staff who was looking for assistance. They will of course ask the people around them for help, i.e. the staff based in the office. If you have other people in other teams wanting assistance who will they speak to? Again it will be the people based in the office.

This is what I mean when I say office based staff 'carry' staff that work from home. Staff based in an office not only have to achieve their targets but they will assist other people too, i.e. they will do additional, less clearly quantified work too, which staff that work from home can conveniently avoid.

Richard_H
Posts: 329
Joined: Wed Feb 10, 2010 7:52 pm

Re: Working from home

Postby Richard_H » Tue Jan 28, 2014 10:52 pm

I mix and match as required. When I have long spells at home I try to pop into the office once or twice a week to make sure they don't forget about me.

When we're on team projects then obviously it's 100% office based.

One tip I would offer is to make sure you keep on top of your paperwork (tax bill, expenses, etc). When I was fully self-employed I used to schedule and hour a week to make sure it was all kept up to date. If I skipped this for a few weeks, it would always take a lot longer than an hour to put straight again.

Edwinacurry
Posts: 92
Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2012 10:03 pm

Re: Working from home

Postby Edwinacurry » Wed Jan 29, 2014 4:59 am

Kristen may have experience of the public sector approach to working from home. In my own experience this can be badly managed and end up a scive, with unmonitored outcomes and a tendency to work from home to suit someones domestic circumstances, look after kids, workmen appointments etc. It's totally different if someone is self employed as they will/should be motivated to actually do some work.

Stevieboy
Posts: 252
Joined: Mon Apr 04, 2011 11:55 am
Location: Chorlton-cum-Hardy

Re: Working from home

Postby Stevieboy » Wed Jan 29, 2014 10:34 am

I have pretty much worked from home for approx 6 years. I am not self-employed and am part of a team of 6 people not including our manager.
2 of us are in the UK, 2 in India and the rest in the US. We interact with other teams who are aslo spread across the globe.
As we work for a global Software house we sometimes have to work late to overlap more with other time zones. Working from home certainly makes this easier. We communicate with each other via Email, IM, Telephone conferencing and more recently Video conferencing. If we need help with something we just ask - as we would do if we were office based.
WFH doesn't work for everyone, but it does for me and a lot of people i know. The added advantage is that I can do it from anywhere with an internet connection.
I know that if I didn't complete my tasks within the given time frame, then i might not have a job. This fact keeps me focused.

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annie
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Joined: Thu Apr 08, 2004 2:08 am
Location: Chorlton

Re: Working from home

Postby annie » Fri Jan 31, 2014 1:13 pm

Edwinacurry wrote:Kristen may have experience of the public sector approach to working from home. In my own experience this can be badly managed and end up a scive, with unmonitored outcomes and a tendency to work from home to suit someones domestic circumstances, look after kids, workmen appointments etc. It's totally different if someone is self employed as they will/should be motivated to actually do some work.


Why SHOULDN'T working from home suit domestic circumstances? So long as the work gets done that's all that matters.
One must always be wary of the march of the right-wing. I advocate public flogging/confiscation of assets/rehoming of their young

Ruby
Posts: 13
Joined: Wed Oct 06, 2010 7:53 am

Re: Working from home

Postby Ruby » Sat Feb 01, 2014 9:30 am

I would LOVE to work from home. However I currently work in project management and it doesn't seem very compatible with WFH. At least, I don't know many people who do it.

How did all you home workers get into it?

ElevenEleven

Re: Working from home

Postby ElevenEleven » Mon Feb 03, 2014 3:22 pm

Ruby wrote:How did all you home workers get into it?


Hi Ruby, when I decided it was the way I wanted to work (back in 2007) I searched for job vacancies on normal job websites but made sure that I did searches with keywords in the criteria such as 'remote','remote working','telecommute','home','work from home','wfh'.

Sites like indeed and remote employment are quite good for this: http://www.indeed.co.uk/Work-From-Home-jobs http://www.remoteemployment.com/ whereas there sites that are specialised to their field, such as IT, on which you can then filter by keywords.

It of course depends on what you can, or want, to do as a lot of WFH jobs seem to be in sales. Being in IT however, there are more and more companies adopting this working model as it reduces overheads and in a lot of case helps people have the work-life balance they need. For example in my current contract I can pop out for lunch, take the dog for a walk, etc as long as I do my hours in total over the week and the work is delivered. My hours are logged via a project management system which I update with details of tasks completed and with evidence.

If you really want to do it, then just keep applying for suitable WFH jobs and when they ask you in the interview why you want to work from home then just be honest (to an extent) and maybe say that you want to achieve a better work-life balance, cut down on the commute.

Ruby
Posts: 13
Joined: Wed Oct 06, 2010 7:53 am

Re: Working from home

Postby Ruby » Sat Feb 08, 2014 10:22 am

I'll give that a try, thanks!


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